Mr. Mirth

Welcome to 5th grade!

 

Contact Information: Room: 106 | Phone: 215-679-6288 x: 4106 | Email: kmirth@upsd.org

 

HOME

Daily Schedule

  • 8:30-8:50 Morning Activities
    • Homework
    • Morning Math
    • Self Selected Reading
    • A.M. Announcements
  • 8:50-9:30 Science / Social Studies
  • 9:30-10:00 ELA Reading
  • 10:00-10:20 ELA Writers' Workshop
  • 10:20-11:00 Special
    • Day 1 Music
    • Day 2 Technology
    • Day 3 Art
    • Day 4 Gym
    • Day 5 Library
    • Day 6 Bonus
  • 11:00-11:20 ELA Writers' Workshop
  • 11:20-12:30 Math
  • 12:30-1:00 Recess
  • 1:00-1:30 Lunch
  • 1:30-2:05 ELA Target Time
  • 2:05-2:35 ELA Guided Reading
  • 2:35-3:10 Math Target Time
  • 3:10-3:15 Prepare for Disissal
  • 3:15-3:30 Dismissal

Mathematics

Mathematics

Order of Operations and Whole Numbers
  • Call of Hierarchy: Black Order of Operations
    • M05.B-O.1.1.1: Use multiple grouping symbols (parentheses, brackets, or braces) in numerical expressions and evaluate expressions containing these symbols.
  • Order of Operations
    • M05.B-O.1.1.1: Use multiple grouping symbols (parentheses, brackets, or braces) in numerical expressions and evaluate expressions containing these symbols.
  • Making 24 The Game of Numbers
    • M05.A-T.2.1.1 Multiply multi-digit whole numbers (not to exceed 3-digit by 3-digit).
    • M05.B-O.1.1.1: Use multiple grouping symbols (parentheses, brackets, or braces) in numerical expressions and evaluate expressions containing these symbols.
  • Otter Rush
  • Exponent Baseball
    • M05.A-T.1.1.2 Explain patterns in the number of zeros of theproduct when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.
  • Function Machine
    • M05.B-O.2.1 Create, extend, and analyze patterns.
  • Stop That Creature
    • M05.B-O.2.1 Create, extend, and analyze patterns.
  • Swimming Otters VARIABLE EXPRESSIONS
  • Algebra Meltdown

Decimals

Multiplying and Dividing Decimals
  • Hoop Shoot Multiplying Decimals
    • M05.A-T.2.1.3 Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths (no divisors with decimals).
  • Decimals Jeopardy
    • M05.A-T.2.1.3 Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths (no divisors with decimals).

Operations with Fractions

Fraction Concepts

    Geometry and the Coordinate Plane

    • Boat Coordinates
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Whale's Adventure
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Meteor Defense Coordinate 1
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • MathPup Flying Saucer
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Locate the Aliens
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Spaceboy to the Rescue
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Space Missle Grid
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.
    • Quadrant Commander
      • M05.C-G.1.1 Identify parts of a coordinate grid, and describe or interpret points given an ordered pair.

    Target 12

    DIRECTIONS

    The object of the game is to score the most points in 12 rounds (Note: number of rounds may be adjusted). 3 points are scored by being the first player to successfully write an equation which equals 12, using the 4 numbers rolled on the dice. One point is scored when the roller rolls 4 numbers that stump the group.


    1. Each player gets a Target 12 recording sheet.
    2. Players roll one die to determine who rolls first. Players then take turns (clockwise) rolling the dice each round.
    3. Play begins when the dice are rolled. Players will use the rolled numbers and their knowledge of order of operations to write an equation which equals 12.
    4. Once a player has an equation written, they will put their pencil down and call out "Twelve." They will then share their equation with the other players.
    5. Other players will accept or challenge the equation (a calculator can be used). If a challenge is made that player must demonstrate why it is incorrect. If all players accept the equation the player receives three points.
    6. If an expression is proven incorrect, that player is finished for the round and other players may continue play.
    7. If ALL players agree that they cannot find an expression, the round is over and the roller gets one point.
    8. The player with the most points at the end of play is the winner. If two or more players are tied, they will have a one round playoff. The roller in the overtime round is the player that wrote the first successful equation.

    Homework

    Tonight's Homework

    (click link the link above for daily assignments)

    ELA

    English Language Arts

    Reading

    Strategies and Skills

    Unit 1

    • Ask Questions
    • Identify Stated & Unstated Main Idea & Supporting Details

    Unit 2

    • Determine Text Importance
    • Identify Sequence of Events

    Unit 3

    • Visualize
    • Make Inferences

    Unit 4

    • Fix-Up Monitoring
    • Summarize Information

    Unit 5

    • Determine Text Importance
    • Compare & Contrast

    Unit 6

    • Make Connections
    • Identify Cause & Effect

    Unit 7

    • Make Inferences
    • Draw Conclusions

    Unit 8

    • Summarize & Synthesize
    • Evaluate Author’s Purpose

    Unit 9

    • Make Connections
    • Distinguish & Evaluate Fact & Opinion

    Unit 10

    • Ask Questions
    • Make Judgments

    Writing

    The Writing Process

    Prewriting

    Ideas are the most important thing. Don't worry about grammar, spelling, organization, punctuation, etc.

    Examples of prewriting:

    • Get ideas
    • Brainstorm
    • Draw a picture
    • Talk to someone
    • Make a word web
    • Free write
    • Make a plan
    • Write an outline
    • Think about your topic
    • Do research

    First Draft

    Pay attention to ideas and organization. Don't worry about grammar, spelling, punctuation too much in your first draft.

    • Group similar ideas together
    • Write a topic sentence
    • Write supporting details
    • Write a conclusion
    • Write a good title
    • Ask a friend for suggestions on ideas and organization

    Final Draft

    Pay attention to ideas, organization, grammar, spelling, punctuation, clarity, format etc.

    • Fix any mistakes in your first draft
    • Add to and change your first draft
    • Make sure your ideas are clear
    • Be careful about spelling, grammar, etc.
    Avi's Secrets For Good Writing

    1. Read, read, read. Reading is the key to good writing. The more you read, the better the writer you can be. You can never read too much.
    2. Write! It's not written until it's on the paper. Story telling is a great art, but it is not story writing.
    3. Write what you would enjoy reading. You'll have more fun, and it will be better.
    4. Rewrite! No one ever writes anything well the first time. The first draft cannot be the last draft. (I rewrite my work fifty-sixty times—or more). Here's a tip: read your first draft, and if you think it's good, you are in trouble. But, if you read it and you see it's not that good, you are in great shape—to get going. The more you rewrite the better your writing will be.
    5. Write for readers. Maybe you understand what you have written, but the writer's job is to have the reader understand it. Keep in mind: writers don't write writing, they write reading.
    6. Listen. Read your work out loud (pencil in hand) and it will let you hear your own writing. It will almost improve itself.

    Revising Your Writing

    "There is no good writing--only good rewriting!"

    What is revising?
    The goal is to make your writing clearer, more interesting, more informative, and more convincing. The most important point is to remember that revising is not editing for grammar and mechanics. This can be done later, when you are sure that you will keep all of the writing you have done and have added anything else you may feel was missing from your rough draft.


    How do I revise my writing?
    When revising your work, you must look at it with a new set of eyes. Put your writing aside for a period of time (it may be ten minutes or ten days), and then go back and read it aloud from beginning to end. Often you will notice that certain words or paragraphs don't sound right, which probably means they need revising. Mark everything that might need to be changed. Even if you are unsure how to change it now, you will be reminded to come back to it later.

    The ARMS method will help you spot places where your work can be improved:

    A
    Add words, phrases, or more information to help make your points clear and easy for the reader to understand. Add transition words, phrases or sentences to tie your thoughts and paragraphs together.
    R
    Remove words that repeat themselves and information that does not relate to the main idea of your paragraph or to the topic of the composition.
    M
    Move around words, phrases, sentences or even whole paragraphs in order to keep your ideas clear and flowing toward a logical conclusion.
    S
    Substitute words with more exact words or phrases that express what you want to say more clearly.

    Tips for Punctuating Dialogue

    1. Use quotation marks to enclose a direct quotation. Indirect quotations need no quotation marks.

    My mother said, “If you need a ride, call me.”

    My mother said that she could give me ride if I called her.


    2. Always begin a direct quotation with a capital letter. When a direct quote is divided by explanatory words, begin the second part of the quotation with a lowercase letter. If the second part of the quotation is a complete sentence, the first word of this sentence is capitalized.

    “If the shoe fits,” said John, “wear it.”

    “I have to go,” said Kate. “Tell Brad I'll call him.”

    3. Place question marks and exclamation points inside quotation marks if they belong to the quote. Place them outside if they do not belong to the quotation.

    Patty asked, “Who wants to go to the movies tonight?”

    Did Patty say, “Mary will be at the movies tonight”?

    4. Use quotation marks to enclose the titles of poems, short stories, songs, reports, articles, and chapters of books.

    “Star Spangled Banner”

    “The Road Not Taken”

    5.Use single quotation marks to enclose one quotation within another. If the quotation within the quotation ends the sentence, use both the single and double quotation marks after the last word of the quotations.

    “I heard you say, ‘Tell Kate’ as you left the office.”

    “I heard you say, ‘Tell Kate.”’

    6. When you write dialogue, begin a new paragraph whenever the speaker changes.

    Angela jumped out of the stands and hurried over to congratulate her friend. “That was a great race,Clarissa!”

    “Thanks, Angela. That was one of my best times ever!”

    “You’ve worked hard on your backstroke,” added Angela, “and now it’s really paying off.”

    “Well, guess we’ll have our work cut out for us next week at districts if we’re going to take gold,” Clarissa exclaimed.

    Links to support writing skills

    Tips-O-Matic

    Grammar 101

    Word Work

    Social Studies

    Social Studies Units

    • Unit 1: The Land of the United States
    • Unit 2: The East
    • Unit 3: The South
    • Unit 4: The Midwest
    • Unit 5: The West

    Science

    Science

    Science Units

    • Scientific Method
    • Variables
    • Mixtures and Solutions
    • Motion and Energy

    Science Study Guides

    • Scientific Method
      • Scientific Method Study Guide
    • Variables
      • Investigation 1 Swingers
      • Investigation 2 Lifeboats
      • Investigation 3 Plane Sense
      • Investigation 4 Swingers
    • Mixtures and Solutions
      • Investigations 1-2 Separating Mixtures/Reaching Saturation
      • Investigations 3-4 Concentration/Fizz Quiz
    • Motion and Energy
      • Investigation 1 Motion
      • Investigation 2 Laws of Motion
      • Investigation 3 Work and Energy

    Classroom Procedures

    A.M. Routine 8:30-8:50

    • Exit bus and come directly to your classroom
    • Assignment book (on desk opened)
    • Homework (bin or board) Place completed assignment in the correct homework bin or write your number on the board.
    • Pencil (take one & leave one)
    • Lavatory
    • Morning Math Activity
    • Self-Selected Reading or Unfinished Work

    General Classroom Rules

    • Treat everyone with respect!
    • Practice active listening
    • Use materials appropriately
    • Keep your chair flat on the floor
    • Take care of drinks, tissues, and trash at appropriate times
    • Use indoor voices

    Desks/ Floor Space/ Materials

    • School supplies only
    • Do not write in or on folders or textbooks
    • No loose papers in desk
    • You may have only one binder / notebook on the floor
    • Respect others desk space
    • Do not keep snacks, lunch, or money in your desk
    • Desk & floor cleared/ chair up at the end of the day

    Lunch

    • Walk & use indoor voices
    • Do not save seats
    • Pay attention to the cafeteria teachers
    • Clean up your area
    • Line up silently

    Homework/ Completed Assignments

    • First & last name, date, and student #
    • If your name (student number) is on the board, you must complete the assignment before going out to recess

    Lavatory Breaks

    • No horseplay or talking in the lavatories
    • Flush
    • Wash your hands (do not waste paper towels/ 3 pulls)
    • Wait silently in line (SSR)

    Line

    • No talking (hallways & stairwells are silent zones)
    • Face forward
    • Hands at your sides
    • Walk at all times
    • Stop at designated spots

    Coat Racks

    • Jackets & sweaters on hooks
    • Book bags lined up on the shelf or floor

    Discipline

    • 1st Infraction: warning (Name on board)
    • 2nd Infraction: √ (lose 5 minutes of recess)
    • 3rd Infraction: 2nd √ (lose token & 10 minutes of recess)
    • 4th Infraction: 3rd √ (lose token, 15 minutes of recess and fill out parent sheet)

    Fifth Grade Supplies

    If you are able to purchase these things for your child, please have them bring these supplies on the first day of school.

    • 5 - 2 Pocket Folders - 1 Yellow, 1 Red, 1 Blue, 1 Green, 1 Orange (Please do not label; we will do that in school)
    • 2 Dozen #2 Pencils
    • 1 Glue Stick
    • 1 Pack of 12 Thin Markers
    • 1 Pack of 12 Colored Pencils
    • 1 Highlighter
    • 2 Dry Erase Markers
    • 1 Clean Old Sock (for dry erase boards)
    • 1 Zippered Pencil Pouch (Optional)-Please no pencil boxes
    • 3 -1 Subject Spiral Bound Notebook